Search
  • Dr JP Guidry DPT CSCS TPI

The Bryson Bulk: Pro's and Con's

With Bryson Dechambeaus’s recent success and win this past weekend at The Rocket Mortgage Challenge I figured I would sit down and write my thoughts on his recent transformation and bulk this offseason.


Let’s start with the fact that adding 40lbs is probably not the best idea for most golfers out there. But, adding some muscle mass can not only help with strength and power production (Force equals mass x acceleration) but will also improve your overall health, help decrease the physical decline of aging and just make you a more capable human being.


Golfers for ages have been tentative to lift weight weights due to fear of getting too bulky, losing mobility, or getting injured. Let’s clear some of those myths up.


1.Getting too bulky

You are not special, adding muscle mass takes hard work and dedication that most don’t have. Adding 5 to 10 lbs. of muscle in 1 year is quite an accomplishment for most people myself included. And that added muscle will not affect your ability to hit a golf ball.


2.Losing Mobility

Strength training through full ranges of motion not only will not cause you to lose mobility but has been shown to maintain and increase mobility. Furthermore, as long as you continue to swing consistently and spend some time daily working on mobility even 5 to 10 minutes you will have nothing to worry about


3.Getting Injured

Again, properly performed and dosed strength training programs not only are safe but have been shown to decrease the risk of repetitive use injuries that are common to golf such as low back, elbow tendonitis, shoulder pain etc.


The Bulk

Bryson was already a pretty good-sized guy before he started so he had the frame to stack on 40lbs with probably much less risk than most.


So, what does that mean for you?


While adding 4O lbs. probably isn’t the best idea, starting with 5 to 10lbs. may not be a bad one for a lot of golfers out there. You don’t need to guzzle 5 protein shakes a day to do this either, your colon will thank you if you don’t. Focus on getting your protein and calories from whole foods using protein shakes only to supplement where needed for convenience.


How do I go about doing this?


Let’s start here. This may seem like a lot but when properly programmed and scheduled it isn’t.


-Strength Train 3 days a week. 30 to 45 min is all you need. Focusing on squats, lunges, deadlifts, chest pressing, overhead pressing, rows, and pullups or pulldowns. Work in the 4 to 8 rep range and with heavier loads.


-Train for speed 2 to 3 days a week focusing on jumps, med ball throws or cable rotations, sprints and speed intentional training (superspeed is one example) 15 to 20 minutes is enough here. Work in the 3 to 5 rep range with 2 to three minutes rest in between and using lighter loads. Speed and intent are key here. Train fast to get fast.


-Walk or be active daily. Shoot for 30 minutes on non-training days


-Track and focus on protein intake shoot for .8 to 1g per lb. of goal body weight, per day and track caloric intake to know where you are. If you want to gain weight add 500 calories if you want to lose weight cut back 500 calories and adjust from there based on progress.


- Drink enough water. Shoot for around 80 to 120 oz per day maybe more on playing days.


- Recover: Focus on getting 8 to 9 hours of quality sleep a night, manage stress, and manage load from both practice and training. Overtraining or under-recovery is real and if you find yourself losing performance, feeling fatigued, having difficulty sleeping, or being irritable this is a good place to look. You may need to cut back some on training volume if this is happening.


- Practice your skills. Make sure that your training does not affect your ability to practice and play as you need. If you are getting too sore cut back on volume and focus on recovery. Manage all of this around your work, family and activity schedules as well


IF THIS ALL SEEMS OVERWHELMING GET HELP. I USE HELP FOR MY OWN PERSONAL PROGRAMMING AND NUTRITION.


That is what we coaches are here for.


If you have any questions email me at johnpaul@guidryptcom


Find out more about what I do at www.guidrygolfandsport.com

0 views
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon

*** Guidry Golf & Sport, LLC does not offer physical therapy services. If you are in need of physical therapy medical services you can contact us and we can give you names of local PT's in the area or contact your doctors office. Guidry Golf and Sport is not responsible or liable for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or products that you obtain through this site. You are encouraged to consult with your doctor with regard to this information contained on or through this website. After reading articles, watching videos or reading other content from this website, you are encouraged to review the information carefully with your professional healthcare provider.

Need clothing for the gym or course?

Check out www.barbellsandbirdies.com